SERVICE PHONE
+86-371-65621391
PRODUCT
CENTER
SERVICE PHONE
+86 371 65621391

Product knowledge

Which is good aluminum or stainless steel?

addtiame:2016/10/26 click:
the answer depends on the purpose the material is to be used for and the conditions under which it is to be used.

Stainless steel does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does. However, it is not fully stain-proof in low-oxygen, high-salinity, or poor air-circulation environments. There are different grades and surface finishes of stainless steel to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Stainless steel is used where both the properties of steel and corrosion resistance are required. It’s resistance to corrosion and staining, low maintenance and familiar lustre make it an ideal material for many applications. There are over 150 grades of stainless steel, of which fifteen are most commonly used.

Aluminium is remarkable for the metal's low density and for its ability to resist corrosion due to the phenomenon of passivation. Structural components made from aluminium and its alloys are vital to the aerospace industry and are important in other areas of transportation and structural materials. Aluminium is almost always alloyed, which markedly improves its mechanical properties, especially when tempered.

The main alloying agents are copper, zinc,magnesium, manganese, and silicon (e.g., duralumin) and the levels of these other metals are in the range of a few percent by weight. One important structural limitation of aluminium alloys is their fatigue strength. Unlike steels, aluminium alloys have no well-defined fatigue limit, meaning that fatigue failure eventually occurs, under even very small cyclic loadings. This implies that engineers must assess these loads and design for a fixed life rather than an infinite life.

Another important property of aluminium alloys is their sensitivity to heat. Workshop procedures involving heating are complicated by the fact that aluminium, unlike steel, melts without first glowing red. Aluminium alloys, like all structural alloys, also are subject to internal stresses following heating operations such as welding and casting. The problem with aluminium alloys in this regard is their low melting point, which make them more susceptible to distortions from thermally induced stress relief. Controlled stress relief can be done during manufacturing by heat-treating the parts in an oven, followed by gradual cooling—in effect annealing the stresses.

Stainless steel and aluminium are two of the most widely used alloys of modern age. They are used in automotive, aerospace, structural and railway industries to mention a few.

The material to be used depends on the purpose and terms of use and is never the other way around.